Tools for Protesting


Tools for Protesting


Gaining worldwide fame during the 2014 Hong Kong protests, Firechat is a communications service that allows protesters to communicate where an internet connection is scarce, nonexistent, or being jammed by authorities.


The advent of the video camera radically changed protesting. Now it was safer, since the presence of video ensured the authorities would, in most cases, only go so far. However, since then, police have ensured to confiscate and delete footage of crucial moments, regardless of the law. Live streaming allows protesters to record events in real time and have clear and convincing evidence if authorities confiscate their devices. Further, since the footage is stored on an external server, it cannot be easily deleted. Ustream in particular, has a large record button on your smartphone’s home screen, allowing easy access to the stream when seconds count. This link goes to Ustream, but check out competing services such as Livestream and Bambuser to find out which one works best for you.

OCLP Manual of Disobedience

The OCLP Manual of Disobedience is what guided the protests in Hong Kong, called the “world’s politest,” and the most advanced short manual on protesting we’ve seen. It is in English, but modeled after Hong Kong’s laws, so modify to fit your assembly accordingly. These protesters won the hearts and minds, not only of the world, which could be manipulated by biased media attention, but of their neighbors and non-protesters in Hong Kong. This manual is a big part of how they did it.

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